Bring Your Parent to School Day
Sean Ruggles

Approximately 25 parents of Goza Middle School students were welcomed to campus on Tuesday for “Bring Your Parent to School Day.” Most who attended dropped in for a period or two when their work schedule allowed, and everyone who attended now has a better idea about the school-day experience for GMS students (and was hopefully able to brush up on their middle school academics).

“We wanted to give our parents an opportunity to actually come sit in our classrooms,” Angela Garner, Goza Middle School Principal, said, “so they have a better idea of how they can help their students succeed. The classroom environment is a lot different than when they were in school.”

In addition to maintaining an open line of communication with their child’s teachers, Garner recommended monitoring grades and assignments through “E-School.”

“If you’re asking your child what they learned or did at school that day,” Garner said, “and they’re not giving you any specifics, then E-School will give you the insight you need to not only check their progress, but also start better discussions with them about their school day. Parents must be proactive.”

There are only so many hours in the school day, and in order to reinforce the importance of education, parents must keep their child accountable at home. Another organized “Bring Your Parent to School Day” is being planned for later in the semester, but parents don’t need to wait until then if they are wanting to sit in on a class.

“I want our parents to understand that we’re all playing on the same team. Our parents are welcome in our classrooms anytime. All they need to do is show up ... and check in." 

-Angela Garner, GMS Principal

“I want our parents to understand that we’re all playing on the same team,” Garner said. “Our parents are welcome in our classrooms anytime. All they need to do is show up at the front office to check in, and they’re free to be part of our school day when it works for them.”

Garner said the impact of playing an active role in your child’s education is “HUGE,” and that the benefits extend beyond just making better grades.

“If you’re looking for a way to connect with your teen, or for something to talk about over dinner, ask them what their favorite subject or class is and why. They need that guidance to realize their natural strengths. Keep that conversation going at least until they graduate,” Garner said.


Arkadelphia Public Schools serves more than 2,000 students in Clark County, Arkansas, ranging from 6-weeks-old through college- and career-readiness - and is home of the Arkadelphia Promise.

APS News   sean.ruggles@arkadelphiaschools.org